Author Archive | Donal G. Burke

Hearne of Hearnsbrook

© Donal G. Burke 2015 The arms of Andrew O Hearne of Hearnsbrook, parish of Killimorbologue in the county of Galway, who died in 1733, were described in a pedigree dated 1782 of his descendant Lady Maria O Kelly, Countess of the Holy Roman Empire, as ‘Gules, three herons Argent membered Or’ given by William […]

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Tannian

© Donal G. Burke 2015 Edward MacLysaght in his ‘More Irish Families’ wrote of the Tannians that, while there were some families of the name in County Galway in the middle of the twentieth century the name was little known outside Connacht.[i] He noted that the ‘Gaelic-Irish’ form of the name O Tanaidhen was used […]

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Cannon

© Donal G. Burke 2015 Edward MacLysaght wrote in his ‘Irish Families, Their Names, Arms and Origins’ that Cannon was ‘the anglicized form of the name of two quite distinct Irish septs. Though identical in English these two are different in Irish. One is Ó Canáin: this is a Hy Many (Ui Máine) sept of […]

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Moran

© Donal G. Burke 2015 Edward MacLysaght, in his ‘Irish Families, Their Names, Arms and Origins,’ described the name Moran as essentially a Connacht name and held that the majority of the population so called belong to the Connacht counties of Mayo, Galway, Roscommon and Leitrim. This he ascribed to the presence at one time […]

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Mulcahy

© Donal G. Burke 2015 Mulcahy was described by Edward MacLysaght in his ‘Irish Families, Their Names, Arms and Origins’ as ‘a fairly common name in south Munster but not elsewhere. It is said to have originated in south Tipperary. The census of 1659 shows that it was numerous in Counties Waterford and south Tipperary […]

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Downey

© Donal G. Burke 2015 Edward MacLysaght, sometime Chief Herald of Ireland, in his ‘Irish Families’ stated that ‘the O Downeys were of some importance in early medieval times, when there were two distinct septs of Ó Dúnadhaigh. That of Síl Anmchadha, of the same stock as the O Maddens, several of whom are described […]

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Kiltormer Old Graveyard

© Donal G. Burke 2015 The graveyard known in the twentieth century as the old graveyard at Kiltormer in east Galway pre-dated the nineteenth century as a burial ground, with its earliest surviving headstones dating from the eighteenth century. In 1838 it was referred to as the ‘old grave-yard still in use.’[i] The old graveyard […]

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Kiltormer church

© Donal G. Burke 2015 Kiltormer in the early twentieth-first century is a parish and village in the barony of Longford in the east of County Galway, in what was in the late medieval period Síl Anmchadha, the ancestral territory of the O Maddens. Samuel Lewis in his 1837 ‘Topographical Dictionary of Ireland’ gave the […]

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Eyre’s church, Eyrecourt

© Donal G. Burke 2015 The churchyard about the late seventeenth century Protestant church at Eyrecourt in the parish of Donanaughta in east Galway appears to have continued in use into the nineteenth century as a burial ground serving the local Anglican Church of Ireland population. Given its high status location, a burial vault constructed […]

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Eyre’s church, Eyrecourt

© Donal G. Burke 2015 The oldest surviving church constructed specifically for the use of the Protestant Church in the east of County Galway is that erected in what would become the village of Eyrecourt at the expense of the Cromwellian Captain John Eyre.[i] Its founder had been the beneficiary of significant lands granted by […]

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